Early intervention facilitates improved treatment outcomes for early-phase psychosis, says study

Early intervention facilitates improved treatment outcomes for early-phase psychosis, says study

Early intervention services (EIS) can improve treatment outcomes for early-phase psychosis, revealed a recent study by a group of researchers at the Zucker Hillside Hospital, New York. The study found that early intervention resulted in superior results compared to two co-primary consequences, namely all-cause treatment discontinuation and the risk of at least one incident of psychiatric hospitalization. The authors said that treatment discontinuation was the reason behind the selection of these outcome measures. Read more

Raloxifene ‘likely candidate’ for augmentation therapy in treating schizophrenia

Raloxifene ‘likely candidate’ for augmentation therapy in treating schizophrenia

Raloxifene, a second generation selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), used for preventing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, can now be a valuable addition to antipsychotic medication for improving outcomes of schizophrenia spectrum disorder in both men and women. According to a recent study by a team of researchers from the Netherlands, raloxifene was found to have positive outcomes without any side effects. Read more

Missouri man with schizophrenia acquitted in 2016 killing of Air Force veteran

Missouri man with schizophrenia acquitted in 2016 killing of Air Force veteran

Timothy Hagins, a 36-year-old man who killed an Air Force veteran in August 2016 and thereafter barged into a house 12 miles away, shouting, “I am here to slaughter the lambs,” has been pronounced not guilty by the judge because of his mental instability. He was legally insane at the time of killing the Air Force veteran, Tech Sgt. David Stechman, as he was off his medications, the judge ruled. Read more

Food preservative shows promising effects in managing treatment-resistant schizophrenia

Food preservative shows promising effects in managing treatment-resistant schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a rare, complex and severe mental disorder affecting at least 0.3 percent of the US adult population. It affects how a person behaves, feels and thinks. A person also experiences agitated movements and a difficulty in performing daily activities. The usual course of treatment comprises psychosocial therapy and pharmacological agents like risperidone, clozapine, and brexpiprazole. However, some studies have demonstrated that at least one fifth or one-half of the patients are resistant to the pharmacological agents. Read more

Infection during pregnancy may cause schizophrenia symptoms in newborn, says study

Infection during pregnancy may cause schizophrenia symptoms in newborn, says study

An activated immune system due to an infection during pregnancy may cause critical cognitive impairment linked to schizophrenia in the newborn, suggests a recent study by researchers at the University of Otago, New Zealand. According to the researchers, schizophrenia is possibly an outcome of an interaction between genetic and environmental “hits.” The combination of these hits over time may lead to development of the mental disorder. Read more

Study links certain teen personality traits with schizophrenia

Study links certain teen personality traits with schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a severe mental health disorder that impacts the way an individual thinks, feels or behaves. Usually affecting individuals in the age group of 16 and 30 years, schizophrenia can, sometimes, affect children too. According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), approximately 1.1 percent of U.S. adults have a 12-month prevalence of schizophrenia. Read more

Study reveals talk therapy changes brain wiring,effective in treating psychosis

Study reveals talk therapy changes brain wiring,effective in treating psychosis

For people suffering from severe mental disorders, often a combination of medication and therapy including talk therapy,works best. Supporting this view is a study published in the journal Translational Psychiatry. Conducted by researchers from King’s College London it shows that coupling medicines along with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), a kind of talk therapy, not only leads to improvement in symptoms of psychosis but also makes this change last for a longer time by strengthening connections in the brain.
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