Ways to overcome panic attacks in sleep

Ways to overcome panic attacks in sleep

A panic attack is an abrupt surge of intense fear or anxiety. Most people usually dismiss an occasional nighttime panic attack as an outcome of stress or restlessness. However, frequent episodes of panic attack in sleep may indicate a serious underlying problem. Panic attacks in sleep can occur with no obvious trigger. Like daytime panic attack, nocturnal attacks can also produce alarming symptoms, including sweating, trembling, shortness of breath, flushing or chills, rapid heart rate and a sense of impending doom.

While panic attacks during night usually last only for a few minutes, the person experiencing the symptoms may take a while to go back to sleep. Nighttime panic attacks may also bother the victim during the day, thereby, affecting the quality of life. Although the actual causes of panic attacks are unknown, genetics, stress and certain changes in the brain functioning may contribute to the problem. Read more

Researchers explore benefits of light therapy in treating bipolar depression

Researchers explore benefits of light therapy in treating bipolar depression

Bipolar disorder is one of the brain disorders characterized by unusual shifts in mood, usually categorized into depressive and manic phases. The manic episodes are characterized by unrestrained behavior, highly irritable mood, excessive talkativeness, lack of sleep, racing thoughts and slurred speech. The depressing episodes can be identified by feelings of hopelessness, despair and lethargy along with change in appetite, social withdrawal, loss of concentration and suicidal thoughts. Read more

Infection during pregnancy may cause schizophrenia symptoms in newborn, says study

Infection during pregnancy may cause schizophrenia symptoms in newborn, says study

An activated immune system due to an infection during pregnancy may cause critical cognitive impairment linked to schizophrenia in the newborn, suggests a recent study by researchers at the University of Otago, New Zealand. According to the researchers, schizophrenia is possibly an outcome of an interaction between genetic and environmental “hits.” The combination of these hits over time may lead to development of the mental disorder. Read more

Differences in brain structure of people with anxiety and depression, reveals study

Differences in brain structure of people with anxiety and depression, reveals study

Major depressive disorder (MDD) and social anxiety disorder (SAD) are two of the most debilitating mental disorders affecting millions of people across the globe. People with MDD or SAD often find difficulty in completing everyday tasks, and maintaining social and personal relationships. An overlap in the clinical symptoms between the two disorders often points to similar brain mechanisms. Very few studies have directly compared the brain structures of people afflicted with these illnesses. A recent study by Sichuan University in Chengdu, China, found that there is a common pattern of structural abnormalities in brains of people suffering from depression and social anxiety. Read more

Mental health of Americans worsening, reveals MHA report

Mental health of Americans worsening, reveals MHA report

Mental health refers to a person’s emotional, cognitive and psychological well-being. It influences the way a person thinks, acts and feels. A person with sound mental health is less likely to feel stressed. Chances are high that he/she will remain happy even in the face of adversaries compared to someone suffering from a mental health problem. Individuals with mental peace will be able to attain success at work, harmony in relationships and more importantly, self-confidence. In contrast, someone who has an unattended mental health problem will often be at war with himself/herself and remain discordant with the surroundings. Read more

International Men’s Day: Infertility in men linked to serious mental health disorders

International Men’s Day: Infertility in men linked to serious mental health disorders

Since the beginning of their adolescent years, men are taught to act and behave tough and conceal their emotions. They are supposed to never cry and hence, rarely whisper about their pent up emotions. Unfortunately, when it comes to infertility issues, even a whisper is replaced by a painful silence, which in the long run affects their mental and physical health. Read more

Brain imaging techniques can help identify suicidal tendencies, says study

Brain imaging techniques can help identify suicidal tendencies, says study

Suicide is one of the leading causes of deaths in the United States, still there is not much progress in research pertaining to diagnosis of suicidal tendencies. While prior researches have been able to decode the brain signals associated with depression, a group of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University is now suggesting how people who attempt suicide can be identified with the help of brain scans using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) method. The study, published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour in October 2017, detailed how the observations could pave the way for a new way of understanding psychological illnesses. Read more

John Green shares details about his OCD problems

John Green shares details about his OCD problems

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can debilitate one’s life. Its symptoms include exhibition of compulsive behavior, constant agitation, unnecessary repetition of same task and tendency to be isolated even in social settings. While the disorder proves to be a disturbing factor in the lives of many, there are some who have expressed their tumultuous feelings and ordeal in their writings. The words that flow out of those authors’ pens reveal the pain and anxiety that OCD patients struggle with each day, while the characters they carve out in their fictions behave just the way they feel and conduct themselves. Read more

Discontinuing antidepressants may increase relapse risk in anxiety patients, says study

Discontinuing antidepressants may increase relapse risk in anxiety patients, says study

Anxiety disorders are a common problem in the United States, with more than 18.1 percent of its population suffering from it. Unfortunately, most people tend to relapse during or after the treatment. Now, a study titled “Risk of relapse after antidepressant discontinuation in anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder” has found how anxiety disorder patients who responded to antidepressants showed reduced relapse rates. Read more