Lena Dunham advocates for physical exercise helping with OCD

Lena Dunham advocates for physical exercise helping with OCD

In a culture dominated by social media and celebrities, Lena Dunham — creator, writer and star of the HBO series “Girls” — uses these tools to share about her own struggle with anxiety and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Through her Instagram account, Dunham posts a workout selfie with part of the caption reading, “To those struggling with anxiety, OCD, depression: I know it’s mad annoying when people tell you to exercise, and it took me about 16 medicated years to listen. I’m glad I did.” Read more

How to tell if a loved one has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

How to tell if a loved one has Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Many people find that lingering question in the back of their mind at one time or another. The type of question that asks, is the iron turned off? Did I lock the door? In most cases, people can shrug off the question or double check. For those who have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, or OCD, it becomes incredibly difficult to ignore these questions of doubt. Discovering if you or a loved one has OCD is not an easy task. While treatment is available to those with OCD, many may not see the signs of obsessive and ritualistic habits that control their lives, much like a horse with a bit. Read more

Shining light on postpartum depression: symptoms, diagnosis and treatment

Shining light on postpartum depression: symptoms, diagnosis and treatment

The postpartum period begins immediately after the birth of a child and extends for approximately six weeks thereafter. The majority of women experience some type of mood disturbance during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. The majority of these mood disturbances are benign and resolve on their own. However, the postpartum period is the most vulnerable time for a woman to develop psychiatric illness with postpartum depression, which occurs in 10 to 15 percent of women in the general population (“Postpartum Major Depression” American Academy of Family Practice, Hirst M.D., October 2010)
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Mental illness plagues the homeless population

Mental illness plagues the homeless population

Many homeless people hide from the eyes of the world. They shuffle quietly through the streets by day, talking to their voices only when they think nobody is looking and they live in shelters or abandoned buildings at night. Some shelters become known as havens for these mentally ill wanderers and take on the appearance of a hospital psychiatric ward. Others live in the woods on the outskirts of cities, under bridges, and even in the tunnels that carry subway trains beneath cities. They are ghosts to the majority of society and, as a result, there are many more people with untreated severe psychiatric illnesses living on America’s streets than are receiving care in hospitals.

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